Can I Be A Saint? Part 1: The Hardships

Some people are wondering why it’s so important to become saints. Most people don’t even know what a saint is. Here’s the definition of a saint, credits go to saintspreserved.com:

Beginning with the early Christian martyrs in the first century, saints were chosen by popular acclaim. Legends of their lives were spread through word-of-mouth. Their stories evolved into some wonderfully fantastic tales, probably arising from our intellectual, moral, and spiritual need for heroes. They fed the hungry, clothed the naked, healed the sick, defended the defenseless – never expecting (and virtually always refusing) payment for their (sometimes miraculous) services.

St. Cecilia, Martyr

From this, we get that a saint is someone who does good works to help their neighbors and do it out of love and with full willingness. A saint does good works from the bottom of their heart, never expecting something in return. Anything received in gratitude does not belong to the saint, because everything they did was in service of Christ with no reward in mind.

saint
/saynt
noun 1 a person who is acknowledged as holy or virtuous and regarded in Christian faith as being in heaven after death.
2 a person of exalted virtue who is canonized by the Church after death and who may be the object of veneration and prayers for intercession. (informal) a very virtuous person.

verb 1 formally recognize as a saint; canonize.
2 (sainted) worthy of being a saint; very virtuous.
– DERIVATIVES sainthood

nounsaintliness noun saintly adjective.
– ORIGIN Old French seint, from Latin sanctus “holy.”

-Definition from Oxford English Dictionery

You don’t need a formal canonization to become a saint. There are probably thousands of saints that are known only among their brethren up in heaven. They didn’t get a canonization and they aren’t demanding one. I will blog more on the subject of canonization later. Right now I’m addressing the question, Can I be a saint?

The answer is YES, absolutely so! We’re all called to be saints. We’re called to imitate those already in heaven. It’s going to be hard in our own personal lives, but it’s going to be worth it. Sainthood today is far different from sainthood a hundred years ago. You probably won’t be burned at the stake for proclaiming yourself a Christian, but people will look down on you and mock you in different ways.

Read Hebrews 12 for encouragement about the suffering you’re going to endure on this journey: (NIV)

1Therefore, since we are surrounded by such a great cloud of witnesses, let us throw off everything that hinders and the sin that so easily entangles, and let us run with perseverance the race marked out for us. 2Let us fix our eyes on Jesus, the author and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy set before him endured the cross, scorning its shame, and sat down at the right hand of the throne of God.3Consider him who endured such opposition from sinful men, so that you will not grow weary and lose heart.

4In your struggle against sin, you have not yet resisted to the point of shedding your blood. 5And you have forgotten that word of encouragement that addresses you as sons:

“My son, do not make light of the Lord’s discipline,

and do not lose heart when he rebukes you,

6because the Lord disciplines those he loves,

and he punishes everyone he accepts as a son.”a

7Endure hardship as discipline; God is treating you as sons. For what son is not disciplined by his father? 8If you are not disciplined (and everyone undergoes discipline), then you are illegitimate children and not true sons. 9Moreover, we have all had human fathers who disciplined us and we respected them for it. How much more should we submit to the Father of our spirits and live! 10 Our fathers disciplined us for a little while as they thought best; but God disciplines us for our good, that we may share in his holiness. 11No discipline seems pleasant at the time, but painful. Later on, however, it produces a harvest of righteousness and peace for those who have been trained by it.

12Therefore, strengthen your feeble arms and weak knees13“Make level paths for your feet,”b so that the lame may not be disabled, but rather healed.

Strengthen your feeble arms and weak knees. The devil is glad that so few people are seeking sainthood anymore. We’re about to turn that around. Starting Christmas Eve, pray about your calling and see how you’ll pursue it. It’s a hard journey full of sacrifice, but it’s worth it. Get ready to join us.

Note: I used the NIV because I couldn’t find the NAB resources for this on the Internet. I’ll edit when I’m able to, but this is basically the message GOD wants you to hear.

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Posted on November 6, 2011, in Pre-Launch, Sainthood and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. Just to ppoint out, we aren’t called to be like those already in Heaven, except for One, only Jesus was perfect, and only He is the way to Heaven. We are all equal in the eyes of God, and equally saved.
    The Lonely Recluse.

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